Wee Words from a Leprechaun

Wee Words from a Leprechaun

A decoration for your desk is a celebration of St. Patrick’s Day. A rock, ribbon, gold coin, a shamrock and a handmade scroll makes a “green” paper weight that lets you kiss the Blarney Stone everyday. According to legend, the kissing of the Blarney Stone brings the gift of persuasive eloquence. Materials Needed: A foil gold coin (I had a gold foil cover from a chocolate candy) A rock 3 leaf paper clover An Irish saying...

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No Fly Zone Paper Weight

No Fly Zone Paper Weight

A personalized paper weight designed to keep those random papers in place. Even in our mostly paperless environments in the office or at home, we all have bills to be paid scattered about, a challenge keeping a favorite recipe flat and easy to read, magazine or newspaper clippings that you are collecting to read at a later date, even printed e-mails or important papers you keep by your computer (passwords?). No worries, these important papers...

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Lighten Up for the New Year

Lighten Up for the New Year

One of the most popular New Year resolutions for decades has been to reduce stress in our lives. Whether it’s picking up a new yoga class, exercise or meditation, attempting to reduce stress has become a national pastime. Crafting is also a great stress-buster and here is a modern version of a candle box that you can make and enjoy relaxing in a hot bubble bath or during mindful meditation. When not in use, the candle can be protected with a...

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A Circle of Gratitude

A Circle of Gratitude

Thanksgiving has historically been a feast to celebrate the harvest since recorded time began. Ancient Greeks enjoyed a harvest festival called the Smophera. Ceres, the Roman goddess of harvest, had a festival called Cerelia that was celebrated on October 4th. In Old England, the autumnal feast and harvest was called Harvest Home. In the United States, the 1621 Plymouth feast and thanksgiving was prompted by a good harvest. Pilgrims and...

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Halloween: Now & Then

Halloween: Now & Then

Halloween dates back to 1745 and has always been celebrated on October 31st. The word Halloween evolved from All Hallows’ Eve, a Christian holiday, celebrated the night before All Saints Day and is also believed to be related to an ancient Celtic festival known as Samhain that celebrated the harvest and the beginning of winter. The Celtic culture believed that on October 31st the veil between the worlds of the living and the dead overlapped and...

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Sweet Compote Combos

Sweet Compote Combos

As early glass goes, if any pieces of Early American pattern glass dishes were to be thought of as fussy, it would be compotes. An elegant dish on a stand, they were designed with intricate patterns and often came with lids that were used for serving liquids such as stewed fruit. The open style compote often had a ruffled or fluted dish or bowl. They were set on high or low stems that could be as simple as colored, cut glass or as complicated...

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